Little Helpers Can Make a Big Difference

On November 16th, more than 200 kids, parents, and Junior League of the Oranges and Short Hills (JLOSH) members participated in a Kids For Kids event.  Together they were able to assemble 1,200 Bonus Bags that contained essential winter items and dental hygiene items to children in “Maplewood, Orange and South Orange through the Community FoodBank of New Jersey’s weekend meal program.”  In addition to these Bonus Bags, the volunteers and little helpers also put together more than 500 healthy snack bags that were distributed to homeless children served in after school programs.

What a wonderful article! To read entire article click here. If you know a child who has volunteered, let us know and we will feature them in our next Random Act of Kid-ness Blog! Send YOUR story to info@zimmermuseum.org

Student Volunteers help Military Mothers Assemble 100 Care Packages

During this holiday season, many U.S. troops will be benefiting from the compassionate student volunteers, community members, and West Michigan Blue Star Mothers.  These volunteers are assembling 100 care packages which include: socks, personal hygiene products, gift cards, and an assortment of blankets to U.S. troops. The Blue Star Mothers organization is a group of compassionate members who have sons or daughters serving in the military.

We are truly grateful for all our U.S. troops and military service members! Let us know if you know someone who is selflessly giving back to our community. E-mail us at info@zimmermuseum.org. Read entire article here.

11-year-old ideas can make a world of difference

Eleven-year-old, Alex Lawson, came up with an idea that inspires children and adults around the world.  Although this event occurred a couple of years back, his kind heart and contribution truly moved us. When the 7.0 earthquake in Haiti happened, young Alex knew he wanted to help, especially since he read that over 50% of the population were kids.  He started to collect as many backpacks he could, old, new, or used, and they were taken to St. Lucie International Airport in Fort Pierce where supplies and aid workers were being flown to Haiti to help.

Reading about this story really inspires youth and adults to be hands on in giving back to our community. What a great read, click here for the full article!  Let us know if your child or someone you know would like to be featured in our next Random Act of Kid-ness blog.

No-Limitz Tennis in Irvine

Being a cool kid can sometimes mean popularity, but it can also mean doing something great for others.  Ryan Teng, a sophomore at Beckman High School, started “No-Limitz Tennis” located in Irvine that teaches special needs kids how to serve and hit tennis balls. Ryan says that he wants to provide a safe, judgement free zone, and secure environment where kids can be themselves, relax, and just have a good time! Sharing your special talent with other kids is definitely being a cool kid.

Do you know a cool kid who has made a difference in their community or another child’s life?  Let us know, and we will feature them in our Random Act of Kid-ness blog! Read full article here.

Scranton Community Helps Feed Hungry Children

As the holiday’s approach, we often find ourselves thinking about the family gatherings and tables filled with homemade, delicious entrees that leave us smiling and going back for seconds or even thirds.  At Scranton High School, located in Pennsylvania, more than 180 community members, including seven-year-old Brendan Hauser, help package 10,000 chicken noodle soup meals to feed those less fortunate than he, and children struggling with hunger throughout the Scranton neighborhood.  The soups will be sent to the following organizations, Friends of the Poor and United Neighborhood Centers of Northeastern Pennsylvania.

If you know someone who has altruistically given back to their community, please let us know and we would love to feature them in our next Act of Kid-ness Blog!  To read the entire article, click here.

Benefits of Blocks and Puzzles for Children

According to researchers at the University of Delaware and Temple University, filling children’s toy boxes with puzzles and building blocks help preschooler’s develop their “spacial thinking.”  Professor Golinkoff of linguistics, cognitive science and psychology at UD states that “parents and caregivers should make sure their kids have experiences that feed into their spatial skill. Simple toys like blocks and puzzles offer kids a foundation for learning subjects like math and science…”

The study wanted to see whether copying block structures would correlate to mathematical skills. Results showed that block skills did predict mathematical skills, and children who participated in puzzles and building block structures were also better at early math.  Click the following link to read the full article!

Summer Camp Updates- Cosmic Creations, Day 4: Rockets

day 4 alka seltzer rockets day 4 monster blobsday 4 laser beams

Yesterday we counted down… 5, 4, 3, 2…. 1… and BLASTOFF!!! All of our Astronauts went through some really intense training to get themselves ready for more space adventures! They hopped through craters (hoola hoops), darted between laser moon beams (swinging pool noodles and string), quickly scurried across a hot surface (soft red mat) and crawled through our worm hole (barrel tunnel)! We also built our own toilet paper rockets and launched some other rockets! You can create your own alka seltzer rockets with a plastic film canister, alka seltzer tablets and water.

And of course while in space, we can’t forget all the creatures and monsters we come across! So we made alien monster blobs with plenty of eyeballs!